Biosecure Cleaning

We offer a unique bio-secure cleaning service that goes beyond the basic principle of a deep clean service for large areas and public spaces, that will offer assurance and peace of mind to your services users and staff.

Biosecurity does not have a one size fits all approach, however 3 basic principles apply to the provision of barriers:

Physical Barriers

This can include the use of coveralls, gloves, face masks or visors.

Chemical Barriers

This will include the use of environmentally sympathetic disinfectants, sanitizers, that clean and then create a barrier to infection re-entering the facility through simple containment initiatives and protocols

Logical barriers

These are the protocols and management methods to ensure management and enhance situations that lower exposure. The logical barriers could be the method of using age, tracking, testing, awareness and monitoring facilities such as farms, schools, play areas and public buildings.

Our approach and delivery model will reflect your needs and that of your service users, for example school children and their parents. The process to achieve the barriers, controls and assurance include the following steps:
  1. Site assessment, as the solution depends on the site, the function and the users;
  2. Protocols, the key to success is containment, action, prevention and assurance. It is crucial that the bio-secure team and your stakeholders understand how the process will work and their role in that process to ensure containment.
  3. Chemical choice, application, storage and verification.
    • The right storage environment as freezing or high heat may deactivate their activity.
    • There are numerous choices but many effective chemical are fewer than off-the shelf  products available to the public or conventional providers.
    • The effective application of chemicals and their concentration is important to understand , the effect of activity between the disinfectant solution and the materials in comes into contact. Some surfaces can become damaged or cause chemical reactions with the surface they are used on.
  4. Cleaning with a foaming detergent, pressure and brushes. This action helps the soap surround the dirt particles and lift them off the surface; the pressure clean and scrubbing helps disrupt cell walls and helps break up bacteria. Foaming the soap adds some help in floating dirt off in hard to reach surfaces such as ceilings and when spraying the soap on surfaces. The rinse will encase the dirt in the soap film (colloidal solution) and will be removed in the rinse water.Without this the application of a disinfectant may not work. Chemicals such as Chlorine compounds do not work well in dirty environments. So, in essence a dirty object that is disinfected is still considered “dirty”. Visible dirt, biofilms, and any other material should be removed before the disinfection step. Removal of any visible dirt from the object manually where possible.
  5. Disinfectant application, ensuring correct dilution to the object and the required contact time before a final rinse and readying for service.Knowing the contact time is important especially when moving objects, such as vehicles and boots. The contact time allows for the disinfectant to do its job to break up the virus or bacterial cell. An alcohol based disinfectant needs time to dry as desiccation is a major mode of killing / breaking up bacteria. Contact time can be lengthened by fine misting or foaming the agent onto the surface. Some of the common products used for disinfection in organics are:
    • Chlorine Compounds: Sodium Hypochlorite / Regular bleach, (not the scented, colour safe, or other compounds) is the standard for clean non-porous surfaces. Residual chlorine should not exceed 4mg/L (4 ppm) when used as a water sanitizer. When using at higher concentration a flush rinse may be needed to reduce residuals to safe levels. Chlorine Dioxide is another product that could be used, but residual levels for water is limited to 0.8 mg/L (0.8 ppm) of activity. Not for use with heavy soiled materials.
    • Acids: These compounds break down cell wall structures. Acetic Acid (Vinegar, 5% acid) is commonly found, but higher concentrations can be obtained if used for topical disinfection. Non-synthetic based products, such as cider vinegar is desired for use. Phosphoric Acid can be used so long as there is not contact with livestock or land in organic production. Higher concentrations of these acids can be aggressive / caustic to some materials.
    • Iodine: Potassium Iodide, and acidified elemental iodine are used as surface disinfectants. Check brand labels for clearance with certifying body. These compounds can stain certain materials they are applied to.
    • Hydrogen Peroxide is used as a water treatment as well as a surface sanitizer. Hydronium ion, and oxygen is produced with its degradation. Be mindful of the initial solution concentration, as dilution may need to be made from a concentrate. These compounds can be corrosive at times with certain metals. Check label for proper use and dilution for the intended applications. Not for use with heavy soiled materials.
    • Alcohol: Isopropyl Alcohol at higher dilutions are effective in drying and breaking down bacterial cell walls. Mostly used in limited applications and for disinfecting hard surfaces topically. Isopropanol, and Ethanol can be used, according to label guidance. These compounds can be aggressive on some synthetic rubbers and plastics.

Some of the common products used for disinfection in organics are:

    • Chlorine Compounds: Sodium Hypochlorite / Regular bleach, (not the scented, colour safe, or other compounds) is the standard for clean non-porous surfaces. Residual chlorine should not exceed 4mg/L (4 ppm) when used as a water sanitizer. When using at higher concentration a flush rinse may be needed to reduce residuals to safe levels. Chlorine Dioxide is another product that could be used, but residual levels for water is limited to 0.8 mg/L (0.8 ppm) of activity. Not for use with heavy soiled materials.
    • Acids: These compounds break down cell wall structures. Acetic Acid (Vinegar, 5% acid) is commonly found, but higher concentrations can be obtained if used for topical disinfection. Non-synthetic based products, such as cider vinegar is desired for use. Phosphoric Acid can be used so long as there is not contact with livestock or land in organic production. Higher concentrations of these acids can be aggressive / caustic to some materials.
    • Iodine: Potassium Iodide, and acidified elemental iodine are used as surface disinfectants. Check brand labels for clearance with certifying body. These compounds can stain certain materials they are applied to.
    • Hydrogen Peroxide is used as a water treatment as well as a surface sanitizer. Hydronium ion, and oxygen is produced with its degradation. Be mindful of the initial solution concentration, as dilution may need to be made from a concentrate. These compounds can be corrosive at times with certain metals. Check label for proper use and dilution for the intended applications. Not for use with heavy soiled materials.
    • Alcohol: Isopropyl Alcohol at higher dilutions are effective in drying and breaking down bacterial cell walls. Mostly used in limited applications and for disinfecting hard surfaces topically. Isopropanol, and Ethanol can be used, according to label guidance. These compounds can be aggressive on some synthetic rubbers and plastics.

Post cleaning

  1. Preventative chemical barriers, this can include the use of sanitizers, gloves, visors or simple shoe sole dips.
  2. Training for team members.
  3. Regular cleaning product selection. After a bio-clean the selection of cleaning products is important and may involve periodical rotation of products as this will help reduce the resistance of the bacterial and other germs in the target area. When tied with good cleaning techniques the load of germs on the area can be minimized and the spread of disease forming agents can be achieved. This then forms the basis of good operational biosecurity.
  4. Monitoring and control to ensure good practice and containment. This is a simple process of ensuring the measures implemented are being followed and the barriers are maintained for the safety and assurance of service users, stakeholders and tea members.